Android O Vs Android N : Top 10 features of Android Oreo over Android Nought

Android Oreo is now official, rolling to eligible devices as we speak. Tons of neat new features are making an appearance on deck, with the most important and actually useful ones being under-the-hood improvements – as is tradition! We’ve neatly summarized most of these for you right here, but there’s much more to the upcoming Android Oreo release than under-the-hood features alone.

One of the not that important, but still relevant areas in which Oreo will differ from Nougat will be the all the major and minor touch-ups to the interface. Admittedly, there aren’t as many major ones as most users would possibly like to see, but such are the times – you have to take the good with the bad.

See this also : Problems with Android Oreo – 6 Things you need to know

Android O vs Android N: All The Changes

1Home screen

Not much changes on the home screen so far. With the official release of Android Oreo, app icons should become more streamlined and bear more similarities to one another thanks to Oreo’s Adaptive Icons feature.

Android Oreo vs Android Nougat : Left Vs Right
Android Oreo vs Android Nougat : Left Vs Right

2Notification shade

Dark is out and white is in… sadly! The notification/quick toggles shade in Android O will feature black icons against a white background, whereas Android Nougat did the complete opposite.

 

Android O looks to improve upon every good thing Android Nougat brought along, and then some. With Android O, we’re getting Notification Channels, which are basically categories that an app can classify its notifications into. This means that instead of having to change notification settings for an entire app, users will now get even more fine-grained control over the kinds of notifications they want.

Notification Controls in Android O (left) vs Android Nougat (right)
Notification Controls in Android O (left) vs Android Nougat (right)

3Quick Settings

n Android Nougat, tapping on the icons for WiFi, Bluetooth, etc. would open up the expandable Quick Settings for that particular item, but in Android O, this works very differently. If you tap on the icons for things like WiFi, Bluetooth, etc, it’ll simply toggle them on/off. However, if you tap on the text beneath these items, it’ll take you to the expandable Quick Settings for the item.

Android O (left) vs Android Nougat (right)
Android O (left) vs Android Nougat (right)

4App drawer

So far, it looks like the app drawers of the two Android releases look similar to one another. We doubt that any groundbreaking overhauls will take place at all this year.

Android Oreo (left) vs Android Nougat (right)
Android Oreo (left) vs Android Nougat (right)

5Google Assistant

Once again, few changes in-between. You can now chat with the Google Assistant, so there’s that, but otherwise, it’s basically the very same smart assistant.

Android Oreo (left) vs Android Nougat (right)
Android Oreo (left) vs Android Nougat (right)

6Settings

This is probably the biggest overhaul in Android O. The majority of menu options in the Settings app have been bundled together into topic-based menus, which was not the case in Android Nougat.

Settings page is seeing another overhaul, and it looks like the slide-over panel from Android Nougat didn’t go down well with the designers over at Google, because it has been booted from the Developer Preview of Android O.

Android Oreo (left) vs Android Nougat (right)
Android Oreo (left) vs Android Nougat (right)

7Splitscreen multi-tasking

Little to no difference between the two.

Android Oreo (left) vs Android Nougat (right)
Android Oreo (left) vs Android Nougat (right)

8Storage

The storage menu has scored a new, more modern interface that looks sleek and informative at the same time.

Android Oreo (left) vs Android Nougat (right)
Android Oreo (left) vs Android Nougat (right)

 

 

 

9Battery

Ditto about the battery menu, which looks better than its predecessor.

Android Oreo (left) vs Android Nougat (right)
Android Oreo (left) vs Android Nougat (right)

10Camera app, still image mode

Aside from the dedicated button that lets you go to video-recording mode, the interface is pretty much the same.

Android Oreo (top) vs Android Nougat (bottom)
Android Oreo (top) vs Android Nougat (bottom)

11Camera app, video mode

The same applies to the video mode – it has also scored a shutter button that will allow you to quickly go back to still image mode.

Android Oreo (top) vs Android Nougat (bottom)
Android Oreo (top) vs Android Nougat (bottom)

We’re certainly excited about some of the prospects of Android O, including Adaptive Icons, and PiP mode on phones and tablets. What about you? Do you think Android O will be an awesome upgrade over Android Nougat? Let us know in the comments section below.

 

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